Frequently Asked Questions


Is my copyright taken away if I post my work in Touro Scholar?

No. We do not ask for you to transfer copyright. We are simply requesting permission to distribute your work on Touro Scholar.

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Who contacts the publishers?

Library staff contacts publishers if necessary to secure permission to post a work. Library staff will never post any work without permission.

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Who holds the copyright to my work?

Please check your publishing agreement for this information.

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Can I restrict access to my work?

Yes, we can restrict access to your work so it is only viewable by those within the Touro College & University System.

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What if my work is under an embargo period?

We respect all embargo periods and will restrict access to the full text of the work until the period expires.

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I don't have electronic versions of old working papers that I'd like to include in the repository. Is it okay to scan the printed page to a PDF file?

Yes--scanning printed pages is a great way to create PDF files for inclusion in the repository. There are two ways to scan a page: using OCR (Optical Character Recognition) or scanning the page as an image. Making OCR scans requires careful proofreading and loses the original formatting of the documents. Image scans cannot be searched. The best solution takes advantage of both of these methods. Many software applications allow for the OCR capture of image scans. When documents are scanned this way, users see the image scan but search the full-text of the document. This is the preferred method for scanning documents for the repository.

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What if I want to take down my work?

If you submit a request for takedown, we will withdraw the record; however, metadata for the record will still remain. .

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What is open access?

Open access means publications that are freely accessible to the public, often with few or no copyright restrictions.

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What is a Creative Commons license?

Creative Commons licenses are licenses that give many more rights back to the authors than traditional publication agreements, such as the right to distribute or modify the work. They are often found in open access journals. There are several different kinds of Creative Commons licenses, all of which require that the original author and source be credited and a copy of the license be displayed on the work.

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